ZFH 2015 Interview #4: The Center for Imaginative Cartography & Research

7 Oct

The Center for Imaginative Cartography & Research ImageToday’s morning interview is with The Center for Imaginative Cartography & Research, a creative collaboration between Emily Halbardier and Erik Sultzer, focusing on the topics of art, life, food, travel, and the environment. Let’s find out more about their views on where the zine scene is headed these days…

ZFH: Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you’ll be showing at ZFH 2015!

The Center for Imaginative Cartography & Research: The Center for Imaginative Cartography & Research is a collaborative project between Emily Halbardier and Erik Sultzer. Erik’s from Kansas, Emily’s from Houston. We started The Center in 2012. Together, we explore relationships between art-making, language, education, geography, craft, and community.

For ZFH, we’ll have a range of projects on display and for sale: “Daily Ferments” is an instructional series on basic food fermentation; “Presents:” is a series of collaborative zines featuring the work of artists we admire; there will be a couple exhibition-related zines (we tend to produce zines/books alongside gallery-based installation projects); 11×17” 3-color Risograph posters of Texas flora; and a handful of other things. The newest zine we’ll have is “Frontier Heritage Waste,” a brief account of our recent travels from Texas to Kansas.

ZFH: What is the future of zines in this new and rapidly digitizing world?

Thecforicandr: We don’t forecast a future much different from the present, except for maybe a revitalization of the art. A zine is an object—a tangible, physical artifact—so there are limits governing its life in a digital, virtual world. Part of a zine’s definition is the printing process and physical reproduction. We think that in a world where more and more information is stored and shared online, more people will also crave and seek out the intimacy and connection that a zine can offer.

ZFH: Were you an analog to digital transition or were you a BB born in the tech age? How does technology and recent technological developments affect your zine-making practice?

Thecforicandr: We each grew up in different times and different places, so we represent both backgrounds. In our studio, we use the computer for nearly all post-production and layout tasks. We generally print in the studio on either Risograph or Xerox, with the odd bit of low-tech relief printing. We also make zines while on the road. In those instances, we use whatever materials are readily available. We always do all the binding and finish work by hand. We want our work to be visually clean while still allowing for the both the artist’s hand and the physical process to be visible. This is one reason why we choose to work with yesterday’s machinery, such as the Risograph— the final product is never perfect.

ZFH: What in your opinion is the best invention of the last 30 years?

Thecforicandr: The smart phone.

ZFH: What in your opinion is the worst invention of the last 30 years?

Thecforicandr: The smart phone.

ZFH: How will you best honor our cyber overlords?

Thecforicandr: We won’t.

Thank you, Emily and Erik!  Follow them on Instagram @thecforicandr.

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