Tag Archives: ZFH 2013

Leroy Brown of ICECUBES tells all!

2 Oct
Today’s zinester feature catches up with Leroy Brown, artist and writer of the existential, icebound comic ICECUBES

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Why do you create zines?

 
Well, I create comics and my book is self published. I’ve always loved comics and wanted to make them.
 

What is your favorite part of zine fest?

Zine Fest Houston is a great place to meet Houston artists and creatives. The great thing about Houston is that the creative community here is very open and accepting and has a very welcoming attitude. 
 

What is something that you’re looking forward to about the 2013 Zine Fest Houston?

Meeting other artists and fans.

 

What made you decide to participate in the 2013 Zine Fest Houston?

I met Shane Boyle, the founder of Zine Fest and he invited me to participate. I’m very glad he did!
 

What new projects are you working on this year?

Well, I am a video editor by trade and I am working on a pilot for a late night music video TV show called Dizzy TV.  Hopefully I can get a local channel to carry it!
I also did a gallery art show in New Orleans called  LaPopSexTVArtShow (http://www.lapopsextvartshow.blogspot.com/)
 

What is something you think people should know about DIY in Houston?

Houston is a great place to be an artist. There’s a great attitude here, plenty of room and an audience willing to explore new stuff.
 

What will be on your table at this year’s Zine Fest?

My comic book ICECUBES and hopefully a small zine I am working on.
 

What other creative ventures do you have besides making zines?

I am an artist (see above) a musician and a TV video editor.
 

Why does self-publishing appeal to you?

I am an artist and it’s my job to put new things out there. People hesitate to support new ideas until they see it for themselves.
 

What is the concept behind your zine?

My comic ICECUBES is a ‘slice of life’ comic that deals with existential themes and identity questions in a humorous fashion. (at least I hope it’s humorous!)
 

How long have you been creating zines?

I’ve been drawing since I was 10. My latest comic ICECUBES was created in 2006.
 

What is/are your favorite place(s) in Houston?

The whole town is awesome! (but I really like Chinatown and Little India)
 

Zinester Feature: Vice Versa Press (ATX)

30 Sep

Today’s zinester feature highlights Vice Versa Press out of Austin! We’re really pleased to have them join us for ZFH 2013; it was great to see other Texans when we were up in Portland for the Portland Zine Symposium, and it’s great to have these neighborinos joining us in Houston for ZFH 2013! Yay!

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What is your favorite part of zine fest?

My favorite part of zine fest is joking around with other tablers and inevtiably finding ways to fight the awkward moments that selling ones good entails.

What is something that you’re looking forward to about the 2013 Zine Fest Houston?

Seeing familiar faces and forming better friendships with other zinesters. Maybe having a few cigarettes outside. Smoking a spliff would be cool.

What are your favorite zines/mini-comics etc.?

Tales of Blarg! is the freakin bomb, anything by sir Aaron Cometbus, PRIZE Comics, Feedback headbanging how-tos

What made you decide to participate in the 2013 Zine Fest Houston?

The fact that 2013 Zine Fest Houston was being held at the Museum of Printing History is awesome. As a printmaker, I’d be a traitor if I did not go.

What new projects are you working on this year?

I’m completing “Guide to Dating Gangsters vol. 2″. It’s been two years since the first issue was released and I’d hate to give anyone the idea that I’ve had any dating dry spells. Just a few close encounters/ it’s complicated.

What is something you think people should know about DIY in Houston?

The fact that DownTogether House is AWESOME. I hung out there for a little bit post-Zine Fest last year and had a really nice time. Got to sleep in the hammock and shoot the shit in general. 

Why does self-publishing appeal to you?

Self publishing appeals to me because it is virtually uncensored. I can print what I want. No sales quota to meet. No audience to cater to. Just me, some sharpies, a couple travel tales, and the copy machine. Plus, I can control ALL the elements of my publication through self publishing. I’ve got the power.

A Chat with Shane Patrick Boyle, founder of Zine Fest Houston!

27 Sep

Today’s spotlight is on Shane Patrick Boyle, a long time creator of zines and the founder of Zine Fest Houston, whose first event was held in 1993. That’s 20 years ago! This guy has held the helm of ZFH in the past and even from afar helps ZFH be as great as it can be in every way! Thanks Shane!

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You can help support Shane’s upcoming zines and attendance at ZFH 2013 through his indiegogo campaign!

 

How did you become interested in zines?

When I was a kid in Beaumont, I dreamed. As many kids do, of starting my own comics publishing empire. This dream was still alive throughout most of high school. In ninth grade, our family moved to North Little Rock, and I started going to a comic shop called Collector’s Edition on a regular basis. The owner was Michael Tierney, who created and self-published a comic book called Wildstars. When I asked his advice on how to get started as a comics publisher, he told me to start small and he explained how to make a simple 5.5x 8.5 pamphlet from 2-sided 8.5 x 11 pages folded in half. By the time I got around to trying this, I was living in Texas again, Alief this time, and had started a science fiction, fantasy and comics club. I followed his instructions to put together the club’s fanzine called Astrozine which I published on a consistent monthly basis for an entire year. Later I discovered there was more to zines than just fanzines. I got into literary, political, art, travel and personal zines. As I got more into zines, I outgrew the dream of becoming a publishing mogul, but  the passion I developed for small-scale self-publishing has stayed with me my whole life.

What do you like about zines?

I like that anyone can create a zine and a zine can be about anything. You don’t need to have a degree or be famous or hire an agent. I have seen zines by fast food workers, single mothers, homeless people, teachers, writers, artists, prisoners, waiters, dish washers, retail employees, kids, retired people, students, squatters, librarians, janitors, temp workers, activists and just about every walk of life. The only credential necessary is the determination to finish a zine.

You can also live anywhere and create a zine. You don’t have to be in a cool city  like Portland or Houston. You can be in a small town in a rural state (as I am currently) or even on the other side of the world. It’s also cool to discover zines from different places and experience interesting locales through the eyes of zinesters.

Ultimately, a zine, regardless of subject, is a personal expression of the person who created it. It is not a commercial product that is the result of marketing research. Zines have no obligation to be popular.
What is something that you’re looking forward to about the 2013 Zine Fest Houston?

I am looking forward to getting out of Mena, Arkansas and visiting with other zinesters. Sure, the scenery is beautiful here, but I’ve been here since Christmas, and other than a trip to Portland for ICAF and a trip to Little Rock for their awesome zine gathering, I haven’t been able to hang out much with people I can actually talk to, so it will be nice to get back to Houston.

New zines and old friends are the main draw for me this year, but I am also looking forward to getting out and revisiting the city I used to live in and looking forward to tasting authentic Mexican food again. Hell, I am even looking forward to the humidity.

What is your favorite place in Houston?

I lived nearly a quarter century, off and on, in Houston, and moved a lot from neighborhood to neighborhood, when I was there, but I found myself returning most often to the east end. I guess Greater Eastwood (not EADO or any of the area the condos have conquered) is what it would be called, but I am also including the area south of 45, surrounding the universities.

Montrose and the Heights are still cool, but have lost a significant chunk of their character over the years, while Eastwood and the surrounding areas are still much the same as they were in the 90s and this area is still reasonably priced compared to other inner loop neighborhoods, especially when you consider how close it is to downtown and two universities.

What new projects are you working on this year?

I am working on four new zines to debut at Zine Fest. They are:

  • Ouachita Journal  #1: A zine about Arkansas   and my experiences living, here,   in Mena (located in the foothills of the   Ouachita Mountains).
  • Offline Adventure Zine #1: a travel narratives zine about getting out and experiencing life, regardless of how old you are or how much money you have or any other excuse that may be holding you back.
  • shane # 9: tenth anniversary issue of my ongoing self-titled zine with a new theme each issue. This issue focuses on gender and sexual orientation in comics.
  • Cluttered Mind #3: Featuring articles, essays, reviews, poetry, comics, fiction and art. This issue includes a reflection on the 20-year history of zine gatherings in Houston.

These zines are more personal than most of my recent work and represent a new direction for me. I am also planning to include some color photos in these zines.

What will be on your table at this year’s Zine Fest Houston?

Mostly the zines I mentioned above, some postcards related to these four zines, stickers and a few of my art prints. I may also bring a deluxe reprint of Walkin’ Man and a micro minicomic featuring a new Flyin’ Man story. Next year, both of these characters will be celebrating their tenth anniversaries.

What other creative ventures do you have besides making zines?

I do prose writing (fiction and nonfiction), art, and comics. I am also in the process of launching a couple of new blogs that tie in with my zines.

A Conversation With Sarah Welch

16 Sep

Today we catch up with Sarah Welch, an illustrator and comics writer, most recently featured on the cover of the latest issue of Cite magazine – very nice! We’re happy she’s pleased with this year’s venue, we are hard pressed to contain the excitement ourselves~ Read on for more!

My name is Sarah Welch and I’ll be tabling at Zine Fest Houston 2013. I’m an artist from Texas, who left Texas to go to Chicago for a long time, but then ultimately came back to Texas. My zines are mostly short comics. I’m legally blind and I like drinking cold beverages in the shower.

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What new projects are you working on this year?

This year I’m working on my first attempt at a comic with an original narrative, Endless Monsoon. It’s about growing older and finding ways to deal or not deal with continuous change. Haha. Is that vague enough? It’s a bit of an amalgamation of my own life, and the lives of my friends, and my first summer here in Houston. I’m trying to pack a lot of flavor into a little package with this one.

What will be on your table at this year’s Zine Fest?

I’ll be tabling with my long time creative partner, James Beard of Mystic Multiples. M.M acquired a clean little Riso printer this year so we’ll definitely have some Riso made zines and prints available. I’ll be bringing in my comics, some original screen prints, and possibly some letterpress goods. We also have a secret surprise I can’t talk about. Just come say hey to us. You’ll be like, “hey,” and then we’ll be like, “hey,” right back at you and everything will be chill and casual.

What is something that you’re looking forward to about the 2013 Zine Fest Houston?

The 2012 Houston Zine Fest–at Super Happy Fun Land–was my first and I was covered in a thick layer of sweat and atmospheric swamp particles for the entire event. This year I am looking forward to the central air conditioning at the Museum of Print History (because I can’t be ruining my wares with all kinds of funky).

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What are your favorite zines/mini-comics etc.?

My favorite zines and comics tend to be the single serving variety. Zines and comics that are well curated collections of images or have an almost oversimplified purpose, i.e. Pictures of Rocks or How to Crack an Egg. I’ve been a big Ed Ruscha person for a minute now and I think it has rubbed off not only on my own work, but my taste in everything else.

Why does self-publishing appeal to you?

Oh boy. Self-publishing is everything. Self-publishing is empowerment, accessibility, and printmaking. It really doesn’t get much better than that.

What other creative ventures do you have besides making zines?

In addition to zines and comics I’ve been trying to cultivate an illustration career, doing jobs for Houston publications and non-profits. Working for clients has been new and exciting and fulfilling. Actually, since you asked, you can see my cover illustration on the latest issue of Cite magazine. I also make art for my own personal pleasure and satisfaction. You can see that stuff, as well as a whole load of other stuff on my websites:

sarahwelch.info
sarahwelch.tumblr.com

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REGISTRATION IS OPEN! (again)

13 Sep

After much anticipation and baited breath, we bring glad tidings to you, dear zinesters:

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We’re opening registration again for Zine Fest Houston at the Museum of Printing History on October 12th!

Click here for table information, prices, and download a registration form for ZFH 2013!

We can’t stress enough, SPACE IS LIMITED!! So get while the gettin’ is good. :]

Double Interview with Lauren and Aaron!

11 Sep

Today’s featured Zinesters are Lauren and Aaron, who’ll be tabling together at ZFH this year! They win the award for most creative interview formatting thus far! We can’t wait to see what they bring to the fest.

Aaron:
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Interview with Richard Alexander of Richy Vegas

28 Aug

We’re really excited about the response we’ve gotten so far when we had pre-registration open! If you haven’t registered yet, don’t worry – we’ll be opening general registration again soon, so stay tuned!

In the meantime, check back here often as we begin to feature interviews with our tablers for ZFH 2013! The first up is with Richard Alexander, whose work, uniquely produced on paper plates, features his life with schizoaffective disorder. Read the interview below!

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What is your favorite part of zine fest?

I like to talk to people about my work when they stop at my table.
 
What is something that you’re looking forward to about the 2013 Zine Fest Houston?

I’m going to take at least thirty minutes off from my table to check out the other tables.  It helps break things up a little.
 
What made you decide to participate in the 2013 Zine Fest Houston?
 
I like the one day format as opposed to two days for most events like these.  I sell just about the same amount of stuff in one day at Zine Fest that I sell in two days at other events.
 
What new projects are you working on this year?

I’m working on part 2 of a two-part story for Richy Vegas Comics.  I will have part one available at Zine Fest.
 
Why does self-publishing appeal to you?
 
My comics are drawn in ball-point pen on paper plates.  The unusual materials and round format don’t exactly interest publishers in taking a chance on me.  In 1998 I sent work to Harvey Pekar for him to look at.  He said that I would probably have to self-publish, which has turned out to be true.
 
What is the concept behind your zine/zines?

Richy Vegas Comics comprise a memoir of my struggles with mental illness.  The round format allows me to play with conventional narrative presentation and break it down a little.  I still have a great interest in readability and accessibility, though.
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